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Posted in South African Cuisine  
Pumpkin Fritters 

Deep– or shallow–fried delicacies, either sweet or savoury. Fritters are made by encasing slices of food in a special batter, or mixing chopped food through a batter before frying.

Well made and perfectly fried fritters should be light, crisp and golden outside, soft and creamy inside and served as soon as they are cooked. Tiny bite-size fritters can be served as appetisers. Larger ones make perfect lunches, served with a crisp green salad and fresh fruit. Sweet fritters, such as pumpkin and banana fritters, are delicious finales to have as dessert at dinner.

The French also make a type of fritter called beignets using choux pastry, sometimes mixed with cheese, which are deep–fried and served as hors d’oeuvre. Sweet ones are filled with cream, custard or jam after deep–frying. In Vienna fritters are made with a light pastry or rich yeast dough shaped into little buns with a filling of cream, custard, jam or fruit and deep–fried.

How to deep–fry Fritters

Use an electric fryer, deep frying pan or deep wide saucepan. Pour in cooking oil to reach halfway up the sides of the frying utensil, making certain it is at least 80 mm deep. Heat oil to moderate 185°C (365°F) — test with a thermometer or by immersing a cube of bread in the hot oil, it is ready to use when the bread turns pale brown in 45 seconds. Place 5–6 fritters into hot oil, fry for 2–3 minutes until golden. Lift out the fritters and drain on crumpled paper towels, keep warm and fry the remaining batches in the same way. Use a slotted spoon or tongs to lower the food into the heated oil and remove when cooked. Serve immediately.

How to shallow–fry Fritters

Put equal quantities of oil and butter into a heavy frying pan to a depth of not more than 5 mm. Heat the fat and cook fritters 2–3 minutes each side or until golden–brown. Drain well on paper towels and serve immediately.

Category: South African Cuisine

Subcategory: Traditional

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